REVIEW: The Mind Museum, Manila

I have been going to Manila since 2004 and the first time I went to Bonifacio Global City a.k.a. ‘The Fort’ there was really not much, maybe a few high-end condos mostly for expats. Now there’s a massive Shangri-La hotel, some of the best restaurants and clubs in Manila, and even themed attractions since the opening of The Mind Museum (2012) and KidZania (2015).

I was in town working on a new project in another part of town but I had some free time on my last day and decided to visit the Mind Museum on my way to the airport. I was curious to see the outcome of a collaboration between JRA and the Science Centre Singapore, which won the THEA award for outstanding achievement as a science museum in 2014.

The Mind Museum is a project by the non-profit Bonifacio Art Foundation, which is financed by the Fort Bonifacio Development Corporation together with private donors and a few sponsors (well acknowledged throughout the museum). It is a good example of public-private stakeholders coming together to build a landmark facility for a new city as opposed to fully government led. This is one thing developers in the Philippines are very good at; just look at the success of areas like Makati, Rockwell, Alabang, Araneta Centre, etc.

I went on a Friday afternoon and it was busy! A few school groups, some families and quite a number of teenagers and young adults, mostly couples. Entrance tickets are priced at PHP625 (USD12.5) for adults, PHP475 (USD9.5) for children (and foreign tourists!) and PH190 (USD3.8) for public school students. This is in line with privately owned attractions in the region and reflective of the purchasing power in Metro Manila.

Being a stand-alone building it provides a number of advantages such as the Science-in-the-park outdoor area, a covered open space in front of the outdoor ticketing area for activation and exhibitions, and a high ceiling. The inside is not that big, and a lot smaller than the Science Centre Singapore for example.

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The layout works well with most of the exhibitions on the ground floor and a 1st floor wrapping around leaving a nice atrium in the centre. The content is ambitious with 250 interactive exhibits through five interconnected stories: AtomEarthLifeUniverse, and Technology. There is also a dedicated teenagers area and Mind pods classrooms on the 1st floor.

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I enjoyed the Technology part the most as it is more what I would expect from a science museum. The piano stairs were my favorite; I loved listening to the different notes as my feet were passing captors walking down the stairs: simple yet memorable.

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The museum has been open for 5 years and it shows. Most of the stations are well worn out and some are even broken. This is where maybe the design by JRA was more suited for a Western market than an Asian market like the Philippines, where school groups are bigger and people in general maybe less aware of how to handle interactive exhibitions. I thought there was also too much text, which no one was reading.

The show component comprises of a live lab demo, a few movie rooms and an auditorium on the first floor. I would have suggested more show and maybe less interactive stations, which is an easier way to manage kids groups and convey a message in this part of the world.

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So here is the verdict. The Mind Museum is a very praiseworthy initiative with all the good intentions. The ambitious variety of topics in such a small space is double-edged: it includes many aspects of schools curriculum but it lacks of depth and of a strong storyline. The museum would benefit from a consolidation into 3 areas (instead of 5) and an open show area in the centre. Maybe for the upcoming renovation, hopefully soon!

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